Thursday, June 2, 2016

Your Speech Has The Power To Change You

In this week's parsha, Bechukosai, we read that the Jewish people will confess their iniquity and their fathers' iniquity. In the next verse it says, that Hashem will bring them into the land of their enemies. It would seem, that after we admit our wrongdoings, Hashem would take us to the Promised Land.

What is the purpose of taking us to the land of our enemies, especially, when in the narrative, we are already in the land of our enemies? What good does admitting our mistakes do for us? How can we apply this to our lives?

These verses, come towards the end of a section, which is filled with the consequences for not keeping the Torah and mitzvas. We refuse, because of our stubbornness, not willing to open our hearts to accept Hashem's Torah and mitzvas wholeheartedly, and of our own will. It is only as a result of the suffering we endure, that we admit our wrongdoing. It is like saying, "I realize that it wasn't worth doing those things." It is not a wholehearted confession, with the resolve to change. This kind of confession, doesn't grant forgiveness. Yet the Torah calls it a confession, so it must have some value.

Speech is powerful, the words we say has an affect on the people who hear it, and on the one speaking. In the case of confession, after repenting and making a commitment  not to do it again. It helps to say it out loud, as your words will add strength to your commitment. Also, when one recognizes that he sinned, putting what he has done to words, will cause him to regret what he did. Even in our case, where his admission is half hearted, it still has some good affect. What it does is bring you to the next step.

Hashem says, "... and I will bring them into the land of their enemies." The key words here are, "and I will bring them," meaning, that now Hashem will be more involved. As Rashi explains, that this is a good thing, because Hashem will send his prophets, to bring us closer to Him. This will bring us to true remorse, and forgiveness.

This all came to pass during the Babbelonian Exile, bringing us back to the land of Israel for the Second Temple Era. However, when Moshiach comes, the Rambam says, that we will repent and immediately be redeemed. This is because, we will return to Hashem of our own free will, and not because the pressure of the exile.

This is true in our relationships. When you do something wrong, the best thing is to admit your wrongdoing, commit to change your ways, and to ask for forgiveness. But for some, this pill may be to hard to swallow, either because of stubbornness or some other reason. This is when admitting, that it wasn't worth it becomes a stepping stone, to rebuilding the relationship. Working on it Together, with counseling, you will only get closer and earn forgiveness.

It is my hope, that soon we will experience returning to Hashem of our own free will, and immediately be redeemed. 

9 comments:

  1. Shalom Rabbi Hurwitz, shlita
    Thank you for your words which are both inspiring and thought provoking. My name is Eliyahu Wolf and I teach at a boys yeshiva high school in Woodmere, Long Island. We are all incredibly inspired by you, your song and your teachings. Thank you for sharing your special light with us. May Hashem grant you continued strength and may you continue to share your luminescence, brightening the lives of so many.

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  2. Thank you very much. Beautiful and important advice. Practical and life changing advice! We look forward to this D'var Torah and find it truly inspires us to strive higher in our Avodas HaShem! May you be blessed with continued strength to inspire others with your noble words and deeds and may you overcome all obstacles. We don't live according to statistics. May you be Zoche to only nissim IyH and only yeshuos in the merit of your bitochon! Good Shabbos!

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  3. I always look forward to reading your thoughts. They are especially meaningful because I know how much effort you put into typing each letter! Thanks for this weeks thoughts and you beautifully phrased insights.

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  4. sometimes people stay in regret of the past they can(t)) change no more... to steep to the next of admission and repentance.

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  5. sometimes people stay in regret of the past they can(t)) change no more... to steep to the next of admission and repentance.

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  6. sometimes people stay in regret of the past they can(t)) change no more... to steep to the next of admission and repentance.

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  7. sometimes people stay in regret of the past they can(t)) change no more... to steep to the next of admission and repentance.

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  8. R' Hurwitz- I have recently been introduced to your blog and I have read many of your past posts. They are very practical, clear and helpful, coming from a deep source of emunah and bitachon. Thank you for the time and effort you invest in teaching and inspiring us. May Hashem continue to give you the strength and ability to keep teacing and uplifting us.

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  9. R' Yitzi, I just recently discovered your amazing blog. I hope to see it every week. To me this really means every thing is truly possible. If I can implement a bit of this light every day it would change every thing. May Hashemi bless you with revealed miracles Mammosh now!!!
    Your friend and Talmud Avrohom Plotkin

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